Mali Independence Day Events

School of World Studies

Mali Independence Day Events

Students and Faculty are invited to take part in the Malian Independence Day events (Fête nationale du Mali) on September 22nd. The events begin with lectures in both English and French. Dr. Patricia Cummins will speak on the topic “Humanitarian Crisis in Mali.” Dr. Cummins serves as Vice Chair of the Richmond Sister Cities Commission, and she recently […]

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Ambassador Rasool’s Remarks at Cabell Library

South African Ambassador Ebrahim Rasool speaks at the opening of “Australopithecine!” — an exhibit At Cabell Library featuring two fossilized specimens of the controversial Australopithecus sediba (A. sediba ). Courtesy of the School of World Studies

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Discussion on the “Anthropology of Zombies”

Anthropology Speaker Series – featuring Amy Nichols-Belo of Randolph-Macon College on the topic “From Invisible Laborers to the Brain-Eating Undead: The Anthropology of Zombies”, a discussion of her research on Northwestern Tanzanian zombie stories, anthropological scholarship on zombies worldwide, and thoughts on what the recent popularity of zombies says about American culture. For more information […]

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Chair in Catholic Studies Lecture Series

The School of World Studies is hosting the annual Chair in Catholic Studies Lecture Series on Thursday, September 27 and Thursday, October 4. The lectures are as follows:

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“Australopithecine!” Exhibit at Cabell Library

The ‘Were-Apes’ of Africa and the Evolution of Hominids Australopithecines. They were part-ape and part-human – “were-apes” – and they lived only in Africa. Australopithecus sediba, a sensational new fossil find from South Africa was amongst the last of them. The species appears to have died out around two million years ago, but its anatomy […]

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Dr. Bernard Means Scans Artifacts from the Betsy in 3D

Dr. Bernard Means, Project Director for the Virtual Curation Unit for Recording Archaeological Materials Systematically (V.C.U.-R.A.M.S.), and his team of VCU Anthropology students, recently visited the Virginia Department of Historic Resources to perform 3D scans of artifacts from the 18th century collier brig Betsy. The Betsy was scuttled in 1781 in the York River at Yorktown,VA during […]

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The Virtual Curation Unit @ VCU

http://youtu.be/N6BPIuFYep0 Bernard Means, Ph.D. is an instructor of Anthropology at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) as well as the Project Director for the Virtual Curation Unit for Recording Archaeological Materials Systematically (V.C.U.-R.A.M.S.), a research effort funded by the Department of Defense’s Legacy Program, and conducted jointly with John Haynes, a VCU alumnus who is now with Army […]

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Edward Abse, Ph.D., Presents “Surveying a Shamanic Landscape: Anthropological Fieldwork with the Mazatec Indians of Southern Mexico”

http://youtu.be/58fd7fOhkbQ The School of World Studies hosts Edward Abse, Ph.D., as he presents research based on his two years of studying shamanism and religious life of the Mazatees, a Native American people of the Sierra Madre Oriental in Mexico. Dr. Abse is a cultural anthropologist, specializing in the anthropology of religion (shamanism; ritual and cosmology; […]

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Costly Coverage: Religious Freedom and Reproductive Rights in the Birth Control Debate

Are women’s constitutional rights to contraception in danger? Should faith-based employers be permitted to opt out of contraceptive coverage from their federally mandated health insurance plans? Four panelists will debate the issue at a public conversation, featuring diverse and opposing views, that assesses religion’s effects on women’s fundamental rights in society and in American and […]

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“Devoted to Death: Santa Muerte, the Skeleton Saint” – Dr. R. Andrew Chesnut’s Book Gains International Recognition

http://youtu.be/oZTGaztkwLo Dr. R. Andrew Chesnut’s most recent book, Devoted to Death: Santa Muerte, the Skeleton Saint has quickly gained international appeal as recent attention has been paid to the Mexican Catholic “folk Saint” Santa Muerte and her large following of devotees – which range from women with unfaithful husbands or lovers to drug traffickers and […]

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